Winter’s remnants

The gazanias usually do well in hot weather.

The gazanias usually do well in hot weather.

The desert winter forecast was one thing but we got another.

January weather was cold and somewhat rainy.  Frigid air swept down like Goth raiders on my Roman driveway garden.  Frost patrol was performed with due diligence, but Jack got to many of the plants that should be blooming now.  The wedelia, though covered, was a complete loss, it appears, and other potential beauties were pruned and rehabbed.

This is the first year I've had good  luck with dianthus.

This is the first year I’ve had good luck with dianthus.

It is a week into spring and we are in prime growing season here in the Sonoran Desert.  Wildflowers have bedecked the urban mountains since late February, early March.

Ice plant doing OK after jittery start.

Ice plant doing OK after jittery start.

The driveway has perked up some.  The ice plant, the red salvia, the gazanias and others stretch their colorful blooms for the sun, a sun which in a few weeks will deliver triple-digit temperatures and an enormous amount of stress to my green-leaved friends.

The red salvia, always a winner.

The red salvia, always a winner.

I thought I would post some of winter’s remnants before the harsh weather strikes.

This Iceland poppy won't be around much longer.

This Iceland poppy won’t be around much longer.

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